Canadian Policy Research Networks

The mission of Canadian Policy Research Networks is to create knowledge and lead public debate on social and economic issues important to the well-being of Canadians. The goal is to help make Canada a more just, prosperous, and caring society.

Founded in 1994, Canadian Policy Research Networks produced several hundred research documents on a wide variety of public policy issues, including citizenship; diversity and Canadian values; productivity and skills; health and an aging population; and the environment. CPRN also hosted the site JobQuality.ca which provided resources on the quality of jobs in Canada. CPRN produced more than 700 publications which touched on almost all the major socio-economic challenges facing Canada

According to a federal government external evaluation from 2005, Canadian Policy Research Networks was somewhat unique among Canadian think tanks having developed expertise in health, work and social policy with a special niche in the area of systematic public engagement. In Think Tanks Across Nations, the authors flag the organization as having had an important interdisciplinary approach to policy research and state that this is “something which…few think tanks ever accomplish. Research from the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina states that Canadian Policy Research Networks had a major influence on Canadian social policy decision-makers and was responsive to the needs of decision-makers in producing policies capable of implementation within short time frames. They further note that Canadian Policy Research Networks was once Canada’s most influential social policy think tank based on website visibility and influence.

In 2003, Canadian Policy Research Networks won Carleton University’s Kroeger College Award in Public Discourse in recognition of excellence in contributing to the quality of public debate in Canada.Dr. Sharon Manson Singer was the most recent President of Canadian Policy Research Networks. The Founder and Past-President was Judith Maxwell who was formerly the Chair of the Economic Council of Canada.

On October 27, 2009 it was announced that Canadian Policy Research Networks would close its doors on December 23, 2009 after 15 years of public service, due to lack of government, private and other public funding resources.

On December 23, 2009, Canadian Policy Research Networks announced that Carleton University will now house the complete body of its reports and publications in hard copy and all archival materials. The documents will be available for use to the general public, free of charge, at the university library. Carleton University also agreed to host and maintain the Canadian Policy Research Networks website for seven years after the closure date to 2017 which will permit electronic access to 15-years of downloadable reports, free of charge. According to Roseann O’Reilly Runte, President of Carleton University, “Carleton has a long tradition as a leader in groundbreaking public policy research. Serving as the repository of the Canadian Policy Research Networks archive will guarantee that our students, researchers and the public continue to have access to the significant body of work undertaken by Canadian Policy Research Networks over the past 15 years.”

Canadian Policy Research Networks had provided original evidence-based research, public policy briefs and recommendations, deliberative dialogues and citizen engagement, stakeholder engagement with business, community and government leaders, and knowledge translation for important public policy issues.

Wikipedia – Canadian Policy Research Networks

Policy Commons

Policy Commons is a one-stop community platform for objective, fact-based research from the world’s leading policy experts, nonpartisan think tanks, and Intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations

We treat think-tank publishing as a formal body of literature in its own right, with tools to systematically search it, cite it, understand its impact, catalog it, and preserve it for the long term.

Canadian Policy Research Networks was a non-profit, non-partisan socio-economic think tank based in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, with a focus on citizen engagement and policy research and analysis. Our research indicates that this organization is no longer active. If this information is not accurate, or if you are a member of this organization and would like to claim the organizational record, please contact us.

Policy Commons
Policy Commons Archived Reports of the Canadian Policy Research Networks

Carleton University Library

The Canadian Policy Research Networks was a non-partisan think tank which operated from 1994 – 2009, providing socio-economic policy research and engagement to Canadian leaders. Canadian Policy Research Networks was best known for offering innovative and creative solutions to public policy issues resulting from timely research, thoughtful analysis and meaningful dialogue – with the goal of helping to make public policy work for Canada. The research agenda included:

  • Social innovation
  • Citizenship and civic engagement, including youth engagement
  • Diversity and Canadian values
  • Creating strong, environmentally sustainable communities
  • Health human resources
  • Health and an ageing population
  • Labour market, productivity and skills development
  • Education and career pathways
  • Job quality
  • Affordable housing

When Canadian Policy Research Networks closed in March 2009, the collection of digital reports was transferred to Carleton Library, and we endeavour to provide continuing access to the this important material and to expand the number of reports that are available electronically.

Carleton University Library

Canadian Policy Research Network Initiatives

How do Creative Cities Work?

How do creative cities work to address simultaneously the twin goals of enhancing economic dynamism and improving quality of life? The answer to this question revolves around the fascinating interrelationships between three Cs: creativity, competitiveness and cohesion. In a nutshell, the presence of creative activity drives competitiveness throughout the rest of the urban economy. However, the success with which an urban region can generate and retain creative activity depends to a large extent on its quality of place and community characteristics that promote strong social cohesion.

How do Creative Cities Work?

Let’s talk about The Society We Want

As a society, Canadians are rethinking our social policy and restructuring our social programs. In this period of shared fiscal concern, we all face hard choices about our priorities. As citizens, we all play an important role in shaping them. Talking about The Society We Want is an important step in nation-building.

The Society We Want is a new, nationwide public dialogue process in which Canadians can meet in small discussion groups to think and talk about issues that will shape the future of our country. As a society, Canadians are rethinking our social policy and restructuring our social programs. In this period of shared fiscal concern, we all face hard choices about our priorities.

As citizens, we all play an important role in shaping them. Talking about The Society We Want is an important step in nation-building. The discussion groups are open to anyone and everyone who believes in identifying shared values, and in seeing those values reflected in our social policy and programs.

Building Caring Communities